Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2018

Abstract

Misalignments between endogenous circadian rhythms and the built environment (i.e., social jet lag, SJL) result in learning and attention deficits. Currently, there is no way to assess the impact of SJL on learning outcomes of large populations as a response to schedule choices, let alone to assess which individuals are most negatively impacted by these choices. We analyzed two years of learning management system login events for 14,894 Northeastern Illinois University (NEIU) students to investigate the capacity of such systems as tools for mapping the impact of SJL over large populations while maintaining the ability to generate insights about individuals. Personal daily activity profiles were validated against known biological timing effects, and revealed a majority of students experience more than 30 minutes of SJL on average, with greater amplitude correlating strongly with a significant decrease in academic performance, especially in people with later apparent chronotypes. Our findings demonstrate that online records can be used to map individual- and population-level SJL, allow deep mining for patterns across demographics, and could guide schedule choices in an effort to minimize SJL’s negative impact on learning outcomes.

Comments

The recommended citation below is in APA style and correctly refers to the specific version of the work accessed from this repository.

Version

The article available for download here is the publisher version. Locate the version of record using the DOI below.

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-23044-8

Publication Title

Scientific Reports

Volume Number

8

Included in

Biology Commons

Share

COinS