Fight or Flight

Rabia Tayyabi, Northeastern Illinois University

Nate Mathews and Kim Ambriz are the faculty sponsors of this project.

Description

My presentation about my solo exhibition called Fight or Flight which is an installation that uses color and movement to invoke a shift in the viewer's emotion. Fight or Flight combines digital and physical media, creating unique and dynamic pieces where viewers are taken aback. I synthesize various processes to create unexpected outcomes. The foundation of this installation is coded abstract animations made with JavaScript using for-loops, trigonometric functions, and data modulation. Using coded animation establishes a sense of mystification where the process is not apparent to the viewer. Once the animations are complete, I project three of them the different walls of the gallery as well as display the others on backlit screens. I also capture hundreds of stills from each animation and select a range of images to merge and manipulate in Photoshop by using a variety of methods. The result is large brightly colored abstract prints that will be displayed outside the gallery. After many appearances of vibrant colors and repeating shapes, I noticed a subconscious influence of Islamic Art on my practice. The art I create is abstracted with no reference to realistic figures or recognizable life. I use mathematical functions to code geometric animations and patterns. Traditional Islamic Art focuses on spirituality created with shapes rather than physical beings. The ideology that forms Islamic Art includes geometric patterns floral and plant-based motifs and calligraphy (Department of Islamic Art, 2001). Islamic Art was never my focus yet has been essential in making meaningful connections between my work.

 
Apr 19th, 12:00 AM

Fight or Flight

My presentation about my solo exhibition called Fight or Flight which is an installation that uses color and movement to invoke a shift in the viewer's emotion. Fight or Flight combines digital and physical media, creating unique and dynamic pieces where viewers are taken aback. I synthesize various processes to create unexpected outcomes. The foundation of this installation is coded abstract animations made with JavaScript using for-loops, trigonometric functions, and data modulation. Using coded animation establishes a sense of mystification where the process is not apparent to the viewer. Once the animations are complete, I project three of them the different walls of the gallery as well as display the others on backlit screens. I also capture hundreds of stills from each animation and select a range of images to merge and manipulate in Photoshop by using a variety of methods. The result is large brightly colored abstract prints that will be displayed outside the gallery. After many appearances of vibrant colors and repeating shapes, I noticed a subconscious influence of Islamic Art on my practice. The art I create is abstracted with no reference to realistic figures or recognizable life. I use mathematical functions to code geometric animations and patterns. Traditional Islamic Art focuses on spirituality created with shapes rather than physical beings. The ideology that forms Islamic Art includes geometric patterns floral and plant-based motifs and calligraphy (Department of Islamic Art, 2001). Islamic Art was never my focus yet has been essential in making meaningful connections between my work.