With the Creatures in the Woods

Anneliese Will, Northeastern Illinois University

Neva Sills is the faculty sponsor of this project.

Description

The body of my drawings contains themes of vulnerability and pent up emotions as result of abusive relationships. My human figures are the victims, unaware of their situation as most abuse victims are. Their entire being exposed, both emotionally and physically, set in wilderness-like settings. They tend to be accompanied by larger, animalistic beings, baring their fangs and monstrous traits. These monsters are representative of the abusers in the relationship, looming over the victim in a threatening way. The gradient of graphite along with the different types of lines it can accomplish provides an endless opportunity for expression. With darker lines, I express feelings of isolation and constant insecurities abuse victims experience. With lighter lines, I convey hope after receiving help. Graphite can also leave scars on the paper if you press hard enough. No matter how much you erase it won’t go away. Even if you try to cover it up, it will still leave the indent, similar to how mental scars will forever stay on abuse victims. As a survivor of abuse, I use my art as a means of coping and to allow my voice to be heard after being silenced for years

 
Apr 19th, 12:00 AM

With the Creatures in the Woods

The body of my drawings contains themes of vulnerability and pent up emotions as result of abusive relationships. My human figures are the victims, unaware of their situation as most abuse victims are. Their entire being exposed, both emotionally and physically, set in wilderness-like settings. They tend to be accompanied by larger, animalistic beings, baring their fangs and monstrous traits. These monsters are representative of the abusers in the relationship, looming over the victim in a threatening way. The gradient of graphite along with the different types of lines it can accomplish provides an endless opportunity for expression. With darker lines, I express feelings of isolation and constant insecurities abuse victims experience. With lighter lines, I convey hope after receiving help. Graphite can also leave scars on the paper if you press hard enough. No matter how much you erase it won’t go away. Even if you try to cover it up, it will still leave the indent, similar to how mental scars will forever stay on abuse victims. As a survivor of abuse, I use my art as a means of coping and to allow my voice to be heard after being silenced for years