Event Title

Analysis Of Barriers To Service That Exist For Chronically Homeless Clients Seeking Affordable Housing In A Case Management Setting

Location

SU 217

Start Date

19-4-2019 9:00 AM

Department

Social Work

Session

Session 8

Description

Existing research into the service barriers chronically homeless clients face when seeking access to affordable housing shows that there are discernable categories that can be compiled to describe the hardships that are placed on what is arguably one of society’s most marginalized populations. The fact that a large part of the city’s population is currently experiencing homelessness is what makes this research not just important, but crucial. For many families, the reality of homelessness is only one missed paycheck away. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to explore and analyze what, if any, barriers exist during the process of providing housing services to a sample of the homeless population in Chicago’s far North side neighborhoods. Additionally, when compared to client case notes, the historical data will reveal the high cost associated with providing social services to the chronically homeless population in Chicago. In this qualitative study, an open coding will be the level of analysis used. Through the subsequent use of a documentation protocol, the researcher will collect data to enable codified categories to be made into data sets. These data sets will then be constantly compared and distilled down until themes emerge. The preliminary findings at present demonstrate how barriers to service impact clients in a negative way. These front-line barriers, therefore, need to be acknowledged and accounted for by street level social service providers when providing housing services to the homeless population. This study will contribute to the existing research through case note and historical data analysis. This research will demonstrate the many ways in which worker bias and negative cultural stigmas associated with the homeless population play a pivotal role in contemporary case management practice. These biases and stigmas, once recognized, can be addressed in ways that add to a social worker’s skills, knowledge, expertise, and inclusivity. Such improvements are factors that are vital considerations in furtherance of the goal of improvements upon current best practice models.

Comments

Angel Resto is the faculty sponsor for this project.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 19th, 9:00 AM

Analysis Of Barriers To Service That Exist For Chronically Homeless Clients Seeking Affordable Housing In A Case Management Setting

SU 217

Existing research into the service barriers chronically homeless clients face when seeking access to affordable housing shows that there are discernable categories that can be compiled to describe the hardships that are placed on what is arguably one of society’s most marginalized populations. The fact that a large part of the city’s population is currently experiencing homelessness is what makes this research not just important, but crucial. For many families, the reality of homelessness is only one missed paycheck away. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to explore and analyze what, if any, barriers exist during the process of providing housing services to a sample of the homeless population in Chicago’s far North side neighborhoods. Additionally, when compared to client case notes, the historical data will reveal the high cost associated with providing social services to the chronically homeless population in Chicago. In this qualitative study, an open coding will be the level of analysis used. Through the subsequent use of a documentation protocol, the researcher will collect data to enable codified categories to be made into data sets. These data sets will then be constantly compared and distilled down until themes emerge. The preliminary findings at present demonstrate how barriers to service impact clients in a negative way. These front-line barriers, therefore, need to be acknowledged and accounted for by street level social service providers when providing housing services to the homeless population. This study will contribute to the existing research through case note and historical data analysis. This research will demonstrate the many ways in which worker bias and negative cultural stigmas associated with the homeless population play a pivotal role in contemporary case management practice. These biases and stigmas, once recognized, can be addressed in ways that add to a social worker’s skills, knowledge, expertise, and inclusivity. Such improvements are factors that are vital considerations in furtherance of the goal of improvements upon current best practice models.