Event Title

Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Insects with Contrast Agent: An Undergraduate Experiment

Location

Village Square

Department

Chemistry

Abstract

As part of our continuing effort to expand undergraduate experiments possible with a colony of the beneficial insect Podisus maculiventris (Spined Soldier Bug), we investigated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a desktop instrument available from Alegre Science. This instrument has a sample size of approximately 1 cm3, ideal for the adult and instars of the species. Images obtained using the Flash 3D pulse sequence showed the general shape of the insect, but did not reveal recognizable internal anatomy. Trinh et al. created an undergraduate experiment in which students synthesized lanthanide contrast agents (CA) and measured T1 values for different concentrations of CAs in water/D2O in an NMR spectrometer, but did not use their product in MRI. Our research shows that solutions of the student synthesized contrast agent provide dramatic image contrast to tap water in desktop MRI, and when injected in dead or anesthetized insects. We attempted to feed contrast agent solution to the insects to create images of the digestive system, and will present our preliminary results.

Faculty Sponsor

Charles Abrams, Truman College

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May 6th, 12:00 PM

Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Insects with Contrast Agent: An Undergraduate Experiment

Village Square

As part of our continuing effort to expand undergraduate experiments possible with a colony of the beneficial insect Podisus maculiventris (Spined Soldier Bug), we investigated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a desktop instrument available from Alegre Science. This instrument has a sample size of approximately 1 cm3, ideal for the adult and instars of the species. Images obtained using the Flash 3D pulse sequence showed the general shape of the insect, but did not reveal recognizable internal anatomy. Trinh et al. created an undergraduate experiment in which students synthesized lanthanide contrast agents (CA) and measured T1 values for different concentrations of CAs in water/D2O in an NMR spectrometer, but did not use their product in MRI. Our research shows that solutions of the student synthesized contrast agent provide dramatic image contrast to tap water in desktop MRI, and when injected in dead or anesthetized insects. We attempted to feed contrast agent solution to the insects to create images of the digestive system, and will present our preliminary results.