Event Title

The Use of the Piano in Argentine Music

Location

Recital Hall

Department

Music and Dance

Abstract

This presentation provides valuable information and insights on the history of incorporating and using the piano in Argentine folklore music. Also, this lecture-performance intends to identify the pioneers who started using the piano to compose or interpret traditional folk tunes and to accompany dances. There are two main areas of study; the first one, referred to as Folkloric Music, involves repertoire originated in the Argentinian countryside, derived from traditional dances and folkloric compositions. The second significant aspect is the cosmopolitan genre known as Tango, which has a deep connection to the second wave of European immigration and a style of music that flourished in the large metropolitan areas of Buenos Aires during the early 1900s. In addition, the research identifies the different levels of difficulty of such a repertoire with the intent to classify its value as potential pedagogical materials for music programs. Finally, the project also attempts to spotlight under-represented composers from the past and the present whose works have been overlooked by the mainstream music scene to include and promote such a repertoire, thus developing an appreciation for a multicultural music scene.

Faculty Sponsor

Susan Tang, Northeastern Illinois University

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May 6th, 10:00 AM

The Use of the Piano in Argentine Music

Recital Hall

This presentation provides valuable information and insights on the history of incorporating and using the piano in Argentine folklore music. Also, this lecture-performance intends to identify the pioneers who started using the piano to compose or interpret traditional folk tunes and to accompany dances. There are two main areas of study; the first one, referred to as Folkloric Music, involves repertoire originated in the Argentinian countryside, derived from traditional dances and folkloric compositions. The second significant aspect is the cosmopolitan genre known as Tango, which has a deep connection to the second wave of European immigration and a style of music that flourished in the large metropolitan areas of Buenos Aires during the early 1900s. In addition, the research identifies the different levels of difficulty of such a repertoire with the intent to classify its value as potential pedagogical materials for music programs. Finally, the project also attempts to spotlight under-represented composers from the past and the present whose works have been overlooked by the mainstream music scene to include and promote such a repertoire, thus developing an appreciation for a multicultural music scene.