Event Title

Are You In or Out? Analysis of Social Behavior in Zebrafish Shoals

Location

Alumni Hall South

Department

Psychology

Abstract

The neural networks and environmental factors that drive social behavior have been studied by examining swimming behavior in groups of zebrafish referred to as shoals, however several different measures have been used across studies leading to conflicting results. The purpose of the current study is to examine swim behavior in shoals of zebrafish and compare the different operational definitions that have been used. Adult male and female zebrafish were randomly selected from their home tanks and placed into a social test tank. Behavior was recorded for 2 minutes and videos were processed using ImageJ and Excel. Two test conditions, based on previous studies, were used; group size (3 fish (3F) or 5 fish (5F)) and tank size (small 6 x 6 inch (SM) and large 10 x 10 inch (LG)). Three operational definitions were used to examine social behavior in the shoal. Shoal area (SA, cm2) is measured as the area of the polygon created by the fish. Nearest neighbor distance (NND, cm) is the smallest distance between any two fish in the shoal. Average interfish distance (AID, cm) is the average of the distance between all the fish in the shoal. Based on previous research, results are expected to show SA and AID increase with an increase in tank size from SM to LG and decrease with an increased group size from 3F to 5F. No difference is expected in NND across either group size or tank size. A positive correlation is expected between only SA and AID. The results from this study will determine the relationship between different measures of social behavior that have been used in the literature and provide insight into the impact of group size and area in shaping shoaling behavior without chemical or environmental manipulations.

Faculty Sponsor

Shannon Saszik, Northeastern Illinois University

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 6th, 12:20 PM

Are You In or Out? Analysis of Social Behavior in Zebrafish Shoals

Alumni Hall South

The neural networks and environmental factors that drive social behavior have been studied by examining swimming behavior in groups of zebrafish referred to as shoals, however several different measures have been used across studies leading to conflicting results. The purpose of the current study is to examine swim behavior in shoals of zebrafish and compare the different operational definitions that have been used. Adult male and female zebrafish were randomly selected from their home tanks and placed into a social test tank. Behavior was recorded for 2 minutes and videos were processed using ImageJ and Excel. Two test conditions, based on previous studies, were used; group size (3 fish (3F) or 5 fish (5F)) and tank size (small 6 x 6 inch (SM) and large 10 x 10 inch (LG)). Three operational definitions were used to examine social behavior in the shoal. Shoal area (SA, cm2) is measured as the area of the polygon created by the fish. Nearest neighbor distance (NND, cm) is the smallest distance between any two fish in the shoal. Average interfish distance (AID, cm) is the average of the distance between all the fish in the shoal. Based on previous research, results are expected to show SA and AID increase with an increase in tank size from SM to LG and decrease with an increased group size from 3F to 5F. No difference is expected in NND across either group size or tank size. A positive correlation is expected between only SA and AID. The results from this study will determine the relationship between different measures of social behavior that have been used in the literature and provide insight into the impact of group size and area in shaping shoaling behavior without chemical or environmental manipulations.