Event Title

Connecting Older Adults to Technology (COAT)

Location

SU 214

Department

Psychology

Abstract

In the past 20 years, the 65+ population has doubled to over 52 million and US Census data anticipates there will be 43 million more senior citizens in the next 40 years. Unprecedented numbers of people are living longer, and they want a high-quality life for as long as possible. This project includes a literature review and research of a social cognitive theory-based model using qualitative and quantitative assessments to explore best practices for connecting older adults to technology. There is a significant mean difference between quality of life among adults over 70 years old who find benefits from using technology than those who do not. Older adult’s well-being can be positively affected by technology use mentally, physically, and emotionally. Americans are living longer and the older they get, the more help they need accessing support, services, and staying connected to others. Increased morbidity and physical problems, social isolation, and loneliness are caused by factors such as advanced age, fewer caregivers, challenges of aging in place, smaller family sizes, finances, covid restrictions and chronic health issues. The desire and ability to utilize Information and Computer Technology (ICT) can help older adults socially engage and better manage their well-being. Albert Bandura’s Social Cognitive Theory can be applied to examine older technology users’ behavior, experiences, and motivation and ascertain best practices to support their use of ICT. Utilizing technology to find information and create and maintain connections can help older adults feel more connected and be healthier than those who spend little to no time with ICT. Literature review supports how a combination of in-person support, on-line help, and on-going training of ICT are vital to older adults finding short- and long-term benefits.

Faculty Sponsor

Lisa Hollis-Sawyer, Northeastern Illinois University

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May 6th, 10:20 AM

Connecting Older Adults to Technology (COAT)

SU 214

In the past 20 years, the 65+ population has doubled to over 52 million and US Census data anticipates there will be 43 million more senior citizens in the next 40 years. Unprecedented numbers of people are living longer, and they want a high-quality life for as long as possible. This project includes a literature review and research of a social cognitive theory-based model using qualitative and quantitative assessments to explore best practices for connecting older adults to technology. There is a significant mean difference between quality of life among adults over 70 years old who find benefits from using technology than those who do not. Older adult’s well-being can be positively affected by technology use mentally, physically, and emotionally. Americans are living longer and the older they get, the more help they need accessing support, services, and staying connected to others. Increased morbidity and physical problems, social isolation, and loneliness are caused by factors such as advanced age, fewer caregivers, challenges of aging in place, smaller family sizes, finances, covid restrictions and chronic health issues. The desire and ability to utilize Information and Computer Technology (ICT) can help older adults socially engage and better manage their well-being. Albert Bandura’s Social Cognitive Theory can be applied to examine older technology users’ behavior, experiences, and motivation and ascertain best practices to support their use of ICT. Utilizing technology to find information and create and maintain connections can help older adults feel more connected and be healthier than those who spend little to no time with ICT. Literature review supports how a combination of in-person support, on-line help, and on-going training of ICT are vital to older adults finding short- and long-term benefits.