Title

Exploring Maternal Health in Ethiopia Using Indigenous Approaches: Policy and Practice Implications

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

5-1-2021

Abstract

The World Health Organization reports reveal that the average risk of dying from pregnancy-related causes in sub-Saharan Africa is about 1 in 45 compared to 1 in 5,400 in high-income countries. In Ethiopia, maternal mortality remains a tremendous problem. Several studies associate the high maternal mortality ratio to the widespread practice of home birth, household income, and lack of transportation. Absent from the findings of these studies is any discussion of the sociocultural contexts that might influence maternal health service utilization. Birthing bears cultural significance accompanied by rituals. Thus, any solution to maternal health problems must consider the sociocultural and grassroots context. It is important to learn the needs and priorities of the mothers who are targets of maternal health policies. Using Indigenous approaches, this study examines the gaps in Ethiopian maternal health policies and programs. The study also identifies culturally relevant solutions that address the needs of communities.

DOI

10.1177/1049731520984829

Publication Title

Research on Social Work Practice

Volume Number

31

Issue Number

4

First Page

343

Last Page

350

ISSN

10497315

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