Event Title

Development Of Methodology And Video Instructions For Electroantennography In The Undergraduate Laboratory

Presenter Information

Stephane Akame, Truman College

Location

Lobby in front of Auditorium

Start Date

19-4-2019 11:00 AM

Department

Biology

Description

Furthering our goal of creating an undergraduate electroantenography (EAG) experiment, we developed a reliable method including preparation and mounting insect antennae, optimization of air flow rate and sample introduction, and operation of the software with clear written and video instructions for students. In order to create the video of antenna preparation and mounting, we designed and 3D printed a microscope adapter to allow positioning of a smart phone for video recording. Our research uses a colony of the indigenous, beneficial insect Podisus masculiventris (the Spined Soldier Bug). Maintaining a colony of these bugs can be done cheaply, and has been described elsewhere. The EAG procedure starts by removing the head of an adult or nymph, along with its antennas, with the minimum damage. The head is mounted on our simple EAG apparatus, placing the antennas on the positive electrode (red electrode) and the head on the ground electrode (black electrode), using commercially available electrical conducting gel, which acts as glue and conducting material. The bug’s head is positioned in a stream of purified, humidified air at a controlled rate. Software is set to record the mV response of the antennae, continuously during the following 20-30 minutes. Samples of volatile compounds to be tested are loaded onto filter paper using an automatic delivery pipette, and placed in a tube connected along the air stream. Using hose clamps, airflow can be directed alternatively through a control tube (without added substance) or test sample (with added substance) air flow to the antennae. We anticipate introducing this experiment to undergraduates in Summer 2019.

Comments

Charles Abrams is the faculty sponsor for this poster.

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Apr 19th, 11:00 AM

Development Of Methodology And Video Instructions For Electroantennography In The Undergraduate Laboratory

Lobby in front of Auditorium

Furthering our goal of creating an undergraduate electroantenography (EAG) experiment, we developed a reliable method including preparation and mounting insect antennae, optimization of air flow rate and sample introduction, and operation of the software with clear written and video instructions for students. In order to create the video of antenna preparation and mounting, we designed and 3D printed a microscope adapter to allow positioning of a smart phone for video recording. Our research uses a colony of the indigenous, beneficial insect Podisus masculiventris (the Spined Soldier Bug). Maintaining a colony of these bugs can be done cheaply, and has been described elsewhere. The EAG procedure starts by removing the head of an adult or nymph, along with its antennas, with the minimum damage. The head is mounted on our simple EAG apparatus, placing the antennas on the positive electrode (red electrode) and the head on the ground electrode (black electrode), using commercially available electrical conducting gel, which acts as glue and conducting material. The bug’s head is positioned in a stream of purified, humidified air at a controlled rate. Software is set to record the mV response of the antennae, continuously during the following 20-30 minutes. Samples of volatile compounds to be tested are loaded onto filter paper using an automatic delivery pipette, and placed in a tube connected along the air stream. Using hose clamps, airflow can be directed alternatively through a control tube (without added substance) or test sample (with added substance) air flow to the antennae. We anticipate introducing this experiment to undergraduates in Summer 2019.