Event Title

Food Security on Physical Activity Levels and Overall Health

Location

Lobby in front of Auditorium

Start Date

19-4-2019 11:00 AM

Department

Psychology

Description

Introduction: This study will analyze the relationship between food security on physical activity levels and overall health. Food security is an ever-growing public health problem for millions of people every day. In 2017, approximately 11.8% of households were food insecure, which is a decline from 12.3% in 2016 (Coleman-Jensen, Rabbitt, Gregory, & Singh, 2018). Food insecurity is very prevalent in low-income families living in rural areas and inner cities, lacking access to affordable and nutritious foods. Individuals from food insecure households are known to have poor overall physical health including higher rates of obesity, along with higher rates of depression and anxiety. The constant psychological and physical stress may bring about lower levels of physical activity. The main objective of this study will be to analyze the relationships between food security, physical activity levels, and overall health. Methodology: The data will be collected using an online survey. The participants will answer questions regarding food security, physical activity levels, and current physical and mental health statuses. Participants will first sign a consent form, and then complete three self-report questionnaires including the U.S Household Food Security Survey Module (Six Item Short Form), The Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS 21), and the Godin Shephard Leisure-Time Physical Activity Scale. Lastly, the participants will complete a demographics questionnaire. Projected Results: It is hypothesized that students who are food insecure will be less likely to be physically active, in both suburb and city environments, compared to students who are food secure. My second hypothesis predicts that students who live in suburban areas are more likely to be physically active that students who live in the city, regardless of food security levels. The final hypothesis predicts that students who are food insecure will experience worse overall health outcomes, compared to students who are food secure. Significance: The purpose of this study is to establish a relationship between food insecurity, physical activity levels, and overall health. The study will compare relationships between the three factors, and compare the data for students who live in the suburbs versus the city. There is a great amount of research done comparing effects of food insecurity on children and families living in rural and city settings. Limited research has been on these relationships among college students, and individuals living in a suburban area.

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Amanda Dykema-Engblade is the faculty sponsor of this poster.

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Apr 19th, 11:00 AM

Food Security on Physical Activity Levels and Overall Health

Lobby in front of Auditorium

Introduction: This study will analyze the relationship between food security on physical activity levels and overall health. Food security is an ever-growing public health problem for millions of people every day. In 2017, approximately 11.8% of households were food insecure, which is a decline from 12.3% in 2016 (Coleman-Jensen, Rabbitt, Gregory, & Singh, 2018). Food insecurity is very prevalent in low-income families living in rural areas and inner cities, lacking access to affordable and nutritious foods. Individuals from food insecure households are known to have poor overall physical health including higher rates of obesity, along with higher rates of depression and anxiety. The constant psychological and physical stress may bring about lower levels of physical activity. The main objective of this study will be to analyze the relationships between food security, physical activity levels, and overall health. Methodology: The data will be collected using an online survey. The participants will answer questions regarding food security, physical activity levels, and current physical and mental health statuses. Participants will first sign a consent form, and then complete three self-report questionnaires including the U.S Household Food Security Survey Module (Six Item Short Form), The Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS 21), and the Godin Shephard Leisure-Time Physical Activity Scale. Lastly, the participants will complete a demographics questionnaire. Projected Results: It is hypothesized that students who are food insecure will be less likely to be physically active, in both suburb and city environments, compared to students who are food secure. My second hypothesis predicts that students who live in suburban areas are more likely to be physically active that students who live in the city, regardless of food security levels. The final hypothesis predicts that students who are food insecure will experience worse overall health outcomes, compared to students who are food secure. Significance: The purpose of this study is to establish a relationship between food insecurity, physical activity levels, and overall health. The study will compare relationships between the three factors, and compare the data for students who live in the suburbs versus the city. There is a great amount of research done comparing effects of food insecurity on children and families living in rural and city settings. Limited research has been on these relationships among college students, and individuals living in a suburban area.