Event Title

The Relationship Between Food Diet and Different Types of Disgust

Location

Lobby in front of Auditorium

Start Date

19-4-2019 11:00 AM

Department

Psychology

Description

Introduction: The present study aims to further investigate if there is a link between general disgust sensitivity, food disgust, and self-disgust as a function of diet. The research on disgust towards items, like meat, have been well established through pathogenic disgust (Egolf, Siegrist, & Hartmann, 2018; Tybur, Laakasuo, Ruff, & Klauke, 2016). Determining whether the three types of disgust are linked could possibly be predictors of mental health, specifically eating disorders. Methodology: All participants will be recruited using NEIU’s SONA System and participants will fill out a packet through Google Forms. To collect data, participants will be asked to complete an informed consent sheet, then the Self-Disgust Scale (SDS), the Moral Disengagement in Meat Questionnaire (MDMQ), the Disgust Sensitivity Questionnaire, the Food Disgust Scale (FDS), and finally a demographic form. The purpose of the SDS will be to measure self-disgust; MDMQ will be used to measure participants’ deliberate shutdown of moral self-regulatory processes when considering the impact of meat consumption; Disgust Sensitivity Questionnaire will be used to assess the moral, injury, sexual, and pathogen dimensions of disgust; and the FDS will be used to assess a participants’ disgust to certain food related (unpleasant) stimuli. Projected results (analysis): It is expected that food diets will be associated with different types of disgust. It is expected that vegetarians and vegans will be more likely to score higher on all scales of disgust than omnivores and conscientious omnivores. It is also expected that vegans will be more likely to score higher on the Disgust Sensitivity Scale and Self Disgust Scale, but score equally on the other scales compared to vegetarians. It is also expected that conscientious omnivores will be more likely to score much higher on the Moral Disengagement in Meat Questionnaire compared to vegans and vegetarians, but not too different than regular omnivores. Lastly, it is expected that all food diets will score equally on the Food Disgust Scale, since pathogenic disgust is what all food diets will have in common. The statistical test that will be used for data analysis will be a One-Way ANOVA along with Tukey’s HSD post-hoc test for all disgust scales and the Moral Disengagement in Meat Questionnaire. Significance: The implications from this study are that by better understanding of possible linkage between the three types of disgust as a function of diet, it can catch earlier signs of disordered eating behaviors before they become apparent. One particular eating disorder, orthorexia nervosa continues to receive attention (Hayes, Wu, De Nadai, & Storch, 2017; Missbach, Dunn, & König, 2017; Costa, Hardan-Khalil, & Gibbs, 2017) and has yet to be included in the DSM-IV of the American Psychiatric Association. Some of the reasons for the difficulty in validating diagnosis are because of its close resemblance to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and eating disorders like anorexia nervosa.

Comments

Amanda Dykema-Engblade is the faculty sponsor of this poster.

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Apr 19th, 11:00 AM

The Relationship Between Food Diet and Different Types of Disgust

Lobby in front of Auditorium

Introduction: The present study aims to further investigate if there is a link between general disgust sensitivity, food disgust, and self-disgust as a function of diet. The research on disgust towards items, like meat, have been well established through pathogenic disgust (Egolf, Siegrist, & Hartmann, 2018; Tybur, Laakasuo, Ruff, & Klauke, 2016). Determining whether the three types of disgust are linked could possibly be predictors of mental health, specifically eating disorders. Methodology: All participants will be recruited using NEIU’s SONA System and participants will fill out a packet through Google Forms. To collect data, participants will be asked to complete an informed consent sheet, then the Self-Disgust Scale (SDS), the Moral Disengagement in Meat Questionnaire (MDMQ), the Disgust Sensitivity Questionnaire, the Food Disgust Scale (FDS), and finally a demographic form. The purpose of the SDS will be to measure self-disgust; MDMQ will be used to measure participants’ deliberate shutdown of moral self-regulatory processes when considering the impact of meat consumption; Disgust Sensitivity Questionnaire will be used to assess the moral, injury, sexual, and pathogen dimensions of disgust; and the FDS will be used to assess a participants’ disgust to certain food related (unpleasant) stimuli. Projected results (analysis): It is expected that food diets will be associated with different types of disgust. It is expected that vegetarians and vegans will be more likely to score higher on all scales of disgust than omnivores and conscientious omnivores. It is also expected that vegans will be more likely to score higher on the Disgust Sensitivity Scale and Self Disgust Scale, but score equally on the other scales compared to vegetarians. It is also expected that conscientious omnivores will be more likely to score much higher on the Moral Disengagement in Meat Questionnaire compared to vegans and vegetarians, but not too different than regular omnivores. Lastly, it is expected that all food diets will score equally on the Food Disgust Scale, since pathogenic disgust is what all food diets will have in common. The statistical test that will be used for data analysis will be a One-Way ANOVA along with Tukey’s HSD post-hoc test for all disgust scales and the Moral Disengagement in Meat Questionnaire. Significance: The implications from this study are that by better understanding of possible linkage between the three types of disgust as a function of diet, it can catch earlier signs of disordered eating behaviors before they become apparent. One particular eating disorder, orthorexia nervosa continues to receive attention (Hayes, Wu, De Nadai, & Storch, 2017; Missbach, Dunn, & König, 2017; Costa, Hardan-Khalil, & Gibbs, 2017) and has yet to be included in the DSM-IV of the American Psychiatric Association. Some of the reasons for the difficulty in validating diagnosis are because of its close resemblance to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and eating disorders like anorexia nervosa.