Event Title

Food Addiction and its Connection with Orthorexia in College Students

Location

Lobby in front of Auditorium

Start Date

19-4-2019 11:00 AM

Department

Psychology

Description

Introduction: This study will analyze the relationship between Food Addiction and Orthorexia Nervosa. Food Addiction has been defined as an impulse to eat highly palatable food for reward or comfort rather than hunger (Ruddock, Christiansen, Halford, & Hardman 2017). Orthorexia Nervosa is defined as an obsession with healthy eating and exercise (Bratman 1997). The current literature does not recognize Food Addiction or Orthorexia Nervosa as categories under the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5), but it has been found that these illnesses can be used to determine other eating disorder symptoms. The main objective of this study will be to investigate if there is a relationship between Food Addiction and Orthorexia Nervosa. Methodology: Participants will be recruited using the online software SONA and may receive extra credit in exchange for their participation. Participants will be given a website link where they can fill out the survey online. When accessed to the website, participants will sign a consent form and fill out two self-report questionnaires. The measures used will be the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) and the ORTO-15. Finally, participants will complete a short demographics survey. Projected Results: It is hypothesized that students who exhibit high food addiction will also show orthorexia symptoms, both illnesses have suggested to predict other eating disorders such as Binge Eating, Bulimia Nervosa and Anorexia Nervosa, so it is possible that there is a relationship between Food Addiction and Orthorexia. A second hypothesis predicts that women will be more likely to show food addiction symptoms while there will be no difference in gender in orthorexia, this is suggested from previous studies that have found similar findings. The last hypothesis predicts that younger students are more likely to show food addiction and orthorexia symptoms, this is presumed from previous findings as well. Significance: The purpose of this study is to identify a connection between Food Addiction and Orthorexia Nervosa that has not been fully explored by previous studies. The present study will consider age and gender and its relationship with food addiction and orthorexia in college students.

Comments

Amanda Dykema-Engblade is the faculty sponsor of this poster.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 19th, 11:00 AM

Food Addiction and its Connection with Orthorexia in College Students

Lobby in front of Auditorium

Introduction: This study will analyze the relationship between Food Addiction and Orthorexia Nervosa. Food Addiction has been defined as an impulse to eat highly palatable food for reward or comfort rather than hunger (Ruddock, Christiansen, Halford, & Hardman 2017). Orthorexia Nervosa is defined as an obsession with healthy eating and exercise (Bratman 1997). The current literature does not recognize Food Addiction or Orthorexia Nervosa as categories under the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5), but it has been found that these illnesses can be used to determine other eating disorder symptoms. The main objective of this study will be to investigate if there is a relationship between Food Addiction and Orthorexia Nervosa. Methodology: Participants will be recruited using the online software SONA and may receive extra credit in exchange for their participation. Participants will be given a website link where they can fill out the survey online. When accessed to the website, participants will sign a consent form and fill out two self-report questionnaires. The measures used will be the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) and the ORTO-15. Finally, participants will complete a short demographics survey. Projected Results: It is hypothesized that students who exhibit high food addiction will also show orthorexia symptoms, both illnesses have suggested to predict other eating disorders such as Binge Eating, Bulimia Nervosa and Anorexia Nervosa, so it is possible that there is a relationship between Food Addiction and Orthorexia. A second hypothesis predicts that women will be more likely to show food addiction symptoms while there will be no difference in gender in orthorexia, this is suggested from previous studies that have found similar findings. The last hypothesis predicts that younger students are more likely to show food addiction and orthorexia symptoms, this is presumed from previous findings as well. Significance: The purpose of this study is to identify a connection between Food Addiction and Orthorexia Nervosa that has not been fully explored by previous studies. The present study will consider age and gender and its relationship with food addiction and orthorexia in college students.