Event Title

The Relations of Social Interactions in Daily Life

Location

Lobby in front of Auditorium

Start Date

19-4-2019 11:00 AM

Department

Psychology

Description

This study examines the impact of social interactions on daily life. Researchers are interested in understanding more about the relationship of social interaction anxiety on various aspects of daily life. Variables that are identified as possibly affecting change in social interaction anxiety as measured by ordinal subject self-report analyses include public speaking, sleep deprivation performance, self-efficacy, and frustration. Public speaking can affect communication performance (King & Finn, 2017). Student academic performance is understood to improve with appropriate average sleep time (National Sleep Foundation, 2014). Low-efficacy is believed to make a person more susceptible to anxiety where a task is present for completion (Bandura, 1977). Frustration is identified as composing of different factors, such as emotional intolerance, entitlement, discomfort intolerance, and achievement (Harrington, 2005). The study will utilize a sample of 75 students from a midwestern university. Participants will take a self-report questionnaire including items pertaining to each of the aforementioned variables in combination with items adopted from the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS). It is hypothesized that gender will affect the amount of social anxiety the participant has while public speaking. It is hypothesized that the participants that show sleep deprivation will show greater levels of social anxiety in social settings than participants who show lower levels of sleep deprivation. It is hypothesized that participants with levels of social anxiety will have lower levels of self- efficacy. Further, it is hypothesized that frustration tolerance and social anxiety are positively correlated. The significance of this study is to better understand social anxiety disorder and its relationship with daily life aspects. Further, analysis is anticipated to assist in the exploratory study of frustration as a possible preliminary contributor to SAD generally.

Comments

Christopher Merchant is the faculty sponsor of this poster.

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Apr 19th, 11:00 AM

The Relations of Social Interactions in Daily Life

Lobby in front of Auditorium

This study examines the impact of social interactions on daily life. Researchers are interested in understanding more about the relationship of social interaction anxiety on various aspects of daily life. Variables that are identified as possibly affecting change in social interaction anxiety as measured by ordinal subject self-report analyses include public speaking, sleep deprivation performance, self-efficacy, and frustration. Public speaking can affect communication performance (King & Finn, 2017). Student academic performance is understood to improve with appropriate average sleep time (National Sleep Foundation, 2014). Low-efficacy is believed to make a person more susceptible to anxiety where a task is present for completion (Bandura, 1977). Frustration is identified as composing of different factors, such as emotional intolerance, entitlement, discomfort intolerance, and achievement (Harrington, 2005). The study will utilize a sample of 75 students from a midwestern university. Participants will take a self-report questionnaire including items pertaining to each of the aforementioned variables in combination with items adopted from the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS). It is hypothesized that gender will affect the amount of social anxiety the participant has while public speaking. It is hypothesized that the participants that show sleep deprivation will show greater levels of social anxiety in social settings than participants who show lower levels of sleep deprivation. It is hypothesized that participants with levels of social anxiety will have lower levels of self- efficacy. Further, it is hypothesized that frustration tolerance and social anxiety are positively correlated. The significance of this study is to better understand social anxiety disorder and its relationship with daily life aspects. Further, analysis is anticipated to assist in the exploratory study of frustration as a possible preliminary contributor to SAD generally.