Event Title

Offenders: An Analysis For Motivational Interviewing

Location

Lobby in front of Auditorium

Start Date

19-4-2019 11:00 AM

Department

Social Work

Description

Background: Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a way of talking with people about change that was first developed for the field of addictions but has broadened and become a favored approach for use with populations in a variety of settings” (Miller & Rollnick, 1991). MI was first developed in the areas of mental health and addiction and was proven to be effective in reducing addiction and the change of behavior in clients by producing different outcomes. As such, the purpose of this research is to examinethe effectiveness of motivational interviewing in reducing recidivism in the probation department in Cook County Illinois. Methods: In this study, we will examine one-hundred cases which are being analyzed using multiple variables including: defendant age; gender; race; type of case for first time offenders; type of charge for first time offenders; type of case for second time offenders; type of charge for second time offenders; term dates of the motivational interviewing application. We will be measuring recidivism, the outcome variable, based on the intensity of the charge, i.e., whether it was a conviction; conditional discharge or a supervision (not a conviction). Preliminary Findings: We produced findings to suggest that those receiving MI experienced a longer time to second conviction relative to those who did not receive MI. This may be due to the fact that “caseworkers use advanced assessment tools and motivational interviewing to match offender needs with treatment plans that will assist offenders in meeting the requirements of court mandated conditions” (County 2018). Discussion and Conclusions: This study examined how MI plays a role in defendants’ recidivism, and explain the outcomes of the general process of motivational interviewing. The preliminary findings suggest that motivational interviewing is indeed effective in reducing recidivism of defendants.

Comments

Jin Kim is the faculty sponsor of this poster.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 19th, 11:00 AM

Offenders: An Analysis For Motivational Interviewing

Lobby in front of Auditorium

Background: Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a way of talking with people about change that was first developed for the field of addictions but has broadened and become a favored approach for use with populations in a variety of settings” (Miller & Rollnick, 1991). MI was first developed in the areas of mental health and addiction and was proven to be effective in reducing addiction and the change of behavior in clients by producing different outcomes. As such, the purpose of this research is to examinethe effectiveness of motivational interviewing in reducing recidivism in the probation department in Cook County Illinois. Methods: In this study, we will examine one-hundred cases which are being analyzed using multiple variables including: defendant age; gender; race; type of case for first time offenders; type of charge for first time offenders; type of case for second time offenders; type of charge for second time offenders; term dates of the motivational interviewing application. We will be measuring recidivism, the outcome variable, based on the intensity of the charge, i.e., whether it was a conviction; conditional discharge or a supervision (not a conviction). Preliminary Findings: We produced findings to suggest that those receiving MI experienced a longer time to second conviction relative to those who did not receive MI. This may be due to the fact that “caseworkers use advanced assessment tools and motivational interviewing to match offender needs with treatment plans that will assist offenders in meeting the requirements of court mandated conditions” (County 2018). Discussion and Conclusions: This study examined how MI plays a role in defendants’ recidivism, and explain the outcomes of the general process of motivational interviewing. The preliminary findings suggest that motivational interviewing is indeed effective in reducing recidivism of defendants.