Event Title

The Uniquely Social Aspect Of Labor Migration From The Philippines

Location

SU 217

Start Date

19-4-2019 12:00 PM

Department

Sociology

Session

Session 8

Description

The economy of the Philippines has long depended on money sent back by its numerous nationals who are employed in foreign nations. The economic impact of this exchange of labor for capital has been discussed in great depth by economists and political scientists, with very little consideration for the cultural and structural effects it has had both in the Philippines and in the United States, the largest market for Philippine labor. The reform of immigration laws in the United States vis-à-vis the Philippines caused a strong increase in the emphasis on education in the English language and healthcare (especially Nursing), strengthening the Philippine economy in a way that attempts at domestic reform had failed to do. The dominant historical narrative often attributes American cultural influence on the Philippines as a result of their historical colonial relationship, though the instances of the English language in popular media has risen much more significantly over the recent decades. In an attempt to gain a more holistic understanding of the relationship between the Philippines and the United States, I will review (1) the history between both nations through warfare and occupation, (2) legislation and governmental institutions in both nations, and (3) media trends. I will demonstrate that (1) no exchange between both nations can be purely economic in character, (2) this exchange of human labor and capital has had a wide-reaching social impact in both nations, and (3) that economic and social factors are interdependent concerns. When concerning oneself purely with financial aspects of what is, effectively, population migration commoditized into labor and capital, it is easy to lose sight of the human aspect, which seems insignificant in the aggregate but is vitally important to understanding the underlying dynamics that drive this highly complex exchange between the two countries. The results of this research will demonstrate why a globalized economy is necessarily social and must be studied as such in order to comprehend even its economic dimensions.

Comments

Brett Stockdill is the faculty sponsor for this project.

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Apr 19th, 12:00 PM

The Uniquely Social Aspect Of Labor Migration From The Philippines

SU 217

The economy of the Philippines has long depended on money sent back by its numerous nationals who are employed in foreign nations. The economic impact of this exchange of labor for capital has been discussed in great depth by economists and political scientists, with very little consideration for the cultural and structural effects it has had both in the Philippines and in the United States, the largest market for Philippine labor. The reform of immigration laws in the United States vis-à-vis the Philippines caused a strong increase in the emphasis on education in the English language and healthcare (especially Nursing), strengthening the Philippine economy in a way that attempts at domestic reform had failed to do. The dominant historical narrative often attributes American cultural influence on the Philippines as a result of their historical colonial relationship, though the instances of the English language in popular media has risen much more significantly over the recent decades. In an attempt to gain a more holistic understanding of the relationship between the Philippines and the United States, I will review (1) the history between both nations through warfare and occupation, (2) legislation and governmental institutions in both nations, and (3) media trends. I will demonstrate that (1) no exchange between both nations can be purely economic in character, (2) this exchange of human labor and capital has had a wide-reaching social impact in both nations, and (3) that economic and social factors are interdependent concerns. When concerning oneself purely with financial aspects of what is, effectively, population migration commoditized into labor and capital, it is easy to lose sight of the human aspect, which seems insignificant in the aggregate but is vitally important to understanding the underlying dynamics that drive this highly complex exchange between the two countries. The results of this research will demonstrate why a globalized economy is necessarily social and must be studied as such in order to comprehend even its economic dimensions.