Event Title

Societal Attitudes And The Likelihood To Sexually Harass

Location

SU 103

Start Date

19-4-2019 10:00 AM

Department

Psychology

Session

Session 2

Description

In this study we will examine the effects of: avoidance of femininity, rejection of homosexuality, restrictive emotionality, traditional ideology, and political affiliation as factors in the likelihood to sexually harass. This study will utilize a slightly updated version of the “Male Role Norms Inventory (MRNI)” originally published by Levant et al. (1996) which “assesses ‘traditional’ masculinity ideology” (Davis, Yarber, Bauserman, Schreer, & Davis, 1998) and traditional gender role constructs. Results of this inventory compared with an updated version of John Pryor’s “Likelihood to Sexually Harass Scale” (1987), will predict that those participants with more rigid societal attitudes will rate more likely to sexually harass. Results will support the hypotheses. Avoidance of femininity, rejection of homosexuality, and restrictive emotionality will be significant predictors of sexual harassment. It is also predicted that those participants who identify as Republicans, those who support Brett Kavanaugh’s testimony in the Kavanaugh v. Blasey Ford trial, and those who are less likely to vote for a female or progressive candidate will also rate higher on the Likelihood to Sexually Harass scale. Results will support the hypotheses.

Comments

Maureen Erber is the faculty sponsor of this project.

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Apr 19th, 10:00 AM

Societal Attitudes And The Likelihood To Sexually Harass

SU 103

In this study we will examine the effects of: avoidance of femininity, rejection of homosexuality, restrictive emotionality, traditional ideology, and political affiliation as factors in the likelihood to sexually harass. This study will utilize a slightly updated version of the “Male Role Norms Inventory (MRNI)” originally published by Levant et al. (1996) which “assesses ‘traditional’ masculinity ideology” (Davis, Yarber, Bauserman, Schreer, & Davis, 1998) and traditional gender role constructs. Results of this inventory compared with an updated version of John Pryor’s “Likelihood to Sexually Harass Scale” (1987), will predict that those participants with more rigid societal attitudes will rate more likely to sexually harass. Results will support the hypotheses. Avoidance of femininity, rejection of homosexuality, and restrictive emotionality will be significant predictors of sexual harassment. It is also predicted that those participants who identify as Republicans, those who support Brett Kavanaugh’s testimony in the Kavanaugh v. Blasey Ford trial, and those who are less likely to vote for a female or progressive candidate will also rate higher on the Likelihood to Sexually Harass scale. Results will support the hypotheses.