Event Title

The Hatchery Chicago - A Qualitative Review

Location

SU 103

Start Date

19-4-2019 11:40 AM

Department

Psychology

Session

Session 2

Description

In 1980, Industrial Council of Nearwest Chicago (ICNC) received a federal grant and has been helping small businesses in Chicago develop and grow ever since. As a business incubator and a social service, the mission of ICNC is to help those with few resources become educated about growing a business, support them in occupying a space in the large lofty warehouse at 320 N Damen, and ultimately help fulfill small business owners dreams. From cleaning products, to hair care, to brandy and coffee bean roasters, the large loft space houses a plethora of individuals nurturing their passion. With over 120 small business tenants among its 416,000 feet, ICNC was originally an old plumbing pipe manufacturer. Occupying a city block, the space is filled with high ceilings, beautiful brick walls, large plank wood floors, large windows, and filled with the energy of excited entrepreneurs. ICNC has a relationship with a microlending company, Accion, who provides small business loans to entrepreneurs within the community. ICNC and Accion discovered, many entrepreneurs wanted to start food businesses but didn’t have the funds to build out a proper kitchen space. With ICNC’s mission to listen to the suggestions and requests of the community and maintain communication with their entrepreneurs, this got their wheels turning, and eventually ICNC and Accion began to discuss the possibility of starting a business incubator that could be strictly for small food businesses. Shortly thereafter, The Hatchery Chicago idea was born. Located in East Garfield Park neighborhood near the Blue line, the Hatchery is a 67,000 square foot space with 56 private kitchens, a large shared kitchen, meeting and event space, and walk-in food storage. Among the six parcels of land they occupy, there is one original structure they built The Hatchery around. Their goal is to foster networking, create business plans, and have on-site training, coaching, and support for their tenants. They want their small business owners to become successful and grow, and some day leave the Hatchery to move on to bigger things. My role in this individualized study is to document the narrative of the development, growth, and evolution of The Hatchery Chicago. I have the privilege of interviewing nearly all of the individuals who’ve played a role in the creation of this project, and will put together the full narrative at the conclusion of my capstone/internship. This is a qualitative study that will provide The Hatchery founders a historical recount of the development of their project. They will archive the historical narrative for themselves, as well as use the narrative to share the “hits and misses” with communities who wish to develop a space like The Hatchery, which is the first of it’s kind at this caliber. I have enjoyed this opportunity immensely, and I would love to share the story of this special place at the symposium.

Comments

Amanda Dykema-Engblade and Ruth (Breckie) Church are the faculty sponsors of this project.

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Apr 19th, 11:40 AM

The Hatchery Chicago - A Qualitative Review

SU 103

In 1980, Industrial Council of Nearwest Chicago (ICNC) received a federal grant and has been helping small businesses in Chicago develop and grow ever since. As a business incubator and a social service, the mission of ICNC is to help those with few resources become educated about growing a business, support them in occupying a space in the large lofty warehouse at 320 N Damen, and ultimately help fulfill small business owners dreams. From cleaning products, to hair care, to brandy and coffee bean roasters, the large loft space houses a plethora of individuals nurturing their passion. With over 120 small business tenants among its 416,000 feet, ICNC was originally an old plumbing pipe manufacturer. Occupying a city block, the space is filled with high ceilings, beautiful brick walls, large plank wood floors, large windows, and filled with the energy of excited entrepreneurs. ICNC has a relationship with a microlending company, Accion, who provides small business loans to entrepreneurs within the community. ICNC and Accion discovered, many entrepreneurs wanted to start food businesses but didn’t have the funds to build out a proper kitchen space. With ICNC’s mission to listen to the suggestions and requests of the community and maintain communication with their entrepreneurs, this got their wheels turning, and eventually ICNC and Accion began to discuss the possibility of starting a business incubator that could be strictly for small food businesses. Shortly thereafter, The Hatchery Chicago idea was born. Located in East Garfield Park neighborhood near the Blue line, the Hatchery is a 67,000 square foot space with 56 private kitchens, a large shared kitchen, meeting and event space, and walk-in food storage. Among the six parcels of land they occupy, there is one original structure they built The Hatchery around. Their goal is to foster networking, create business plans, and have on-site training, coaching, and support for their tenants. They want their small business owners to become successful and grow, and some day leave the Hatchery to move on to bigger things. My role in this individualized study is to document the narrative of the development, growth, and evolution of The Hatchery Chicago. I have the privilege of interviewing nearly all of the individuals who’ve played a role in the creation of this project, and will put together the full narrative at the conclusion of my capstone/internship. This is a qualitative study that will provide The Hatchery founders a historical recount of the development of their project. They will archive the historical narrative for themselves, as well as use the narrative to share the “hits and misses” with communities who wish to develop a space like The Hatchery, which is the first of it’s kind at this caliber. I have enjoyed this opportunity immensely, and I would love to share the story of this special place at the symposium.