Event Title

The Role Of Gesture On Math Learning

Location

SU 103

Start Date

19-4-2019 11:20 AM

Department

Psychology

Session

Session 2

Description

Past research supports the inclusion of gesture in math instruction as it benefits students in math learning (Church, Ayman-Nolley, and Estrada, 2004). However, the impact of gestured instruction has not been studied in the context of demographic variables. Research suggests that a demographic variable of interest as it pertains to childhood learning is the level of parental education. Parents are the first to communicate with their child and in that sense are the first to influence a child’s development. Parents also function as experts and aid children with problem-solving until children are able to do it on their own (Mermelshtine, 2017). Exploring parent education is an important socio-contextual variable to consider when examining techniques to improve learning. Consequently, parent-child interactions have an impact on academic involvement and effective scaffolding (Davis-Kean, 2005 and Mermelshtine, 2017). Children with parents with a higher educational level have been known to score higher on their IQ test (Cianci, 2013). Additionally, parents with higher educational levels often have higher expectations for their children’s achievement— particularly, math achievement which is the focus of this study (Aytekin, Baltaci, Yildiz, 2018). In our research, we ask how parental education interacts with gesture instruction to affect math learning in second-graders.

Comments

Ruth (Breckie) Church is the faculty sponsor of this project.

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Apr 19th, 11:20 AM

The Role Of Gesture On Math Learning

SU 103

Past research supports the inclusion of gesture in math instruction as it benefits students in math learning (Church, Ayman-Nolley, and Estrada, 2004). However, the impact of gestured instruction has not been studied in the context of demographic variables. Research suggests that a demographic variable of interest as it pertains to childhood learning is the level of parental education. Parents are the first to communicate with their child and in that sense are the first to influence a child’s development. Parents also function as experts and aid children with problem-solving until children are able to do it on their own (Mermelshtine, 2017). Exploring parent education is an important socio-contextual variable to consider when examining techniques to improve learning. Consequently, parent-child interactions have an impact on academic involvement and effective scaffolding (Davis-Kean, 2005 and Mermelshtine, 2017). Children with parents with a higher educational level have been known to score higher on their IQ test (Cianci, 2013). Additionally, parents with higher educational levels often have higher expectations for their children’s achievement— particularly, math achievement which is the focus of this study (Aytekin, Baltaci, Yildiz, 2018). In our research, we ask how parental education interacts with gesture instruction to affect math learning in second-graders.