Event Title

The Role Of Gestures In Teaching Spanish Speaking Students’ Mathematics Equivalence

Location

SU 103

Start Date

19-4-2019 10:20 AM

Department

Psychology

Session

Session 2

Description

This research will investigate whether gestures help second graders better understand the mathematical concept of equivalence. Previous research has shown that there is a significant improvement on math learning when gestures are included with speech instruction (Koumoutsakis et al., 2016). However, little research has examined how gestured instruction affects child learners with different language experiences (Church et al., 2004). We will examine how language of the learner influences their receptivity to speech and gesture instruction. Previous research (Alonzo et. al, 2018) has shown that when Spanish speakers with little to no English were given Spanish instructions with gesture, little learning happened. The current research examines what role language preference (whether a child prefers Spanish or English) plays in conjunction with speech and gestures in math instruction.

Comments

Ruth (Breckie) Church is the faculty sponsor of this project.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 19th, 10:20 AM

The Role Of Gestures In Teaching Spanish Speaking Students’ Mathematics Equivalence

SU 103

This research will investigate whether gestures help second graders better understand the mathematical concept of equivalence. Previous research has shown that there is a significant improvement on math learning when gestures are included with speech instruction (Koumoutsakis et al., 2016). However, little research has examined how gestured instruction affects child learners with different language experiences (Church et al., 2004). We will examine how language of the learner influences their receptivity to speech and gesture instruction. Previous research (Alonzo et. al, 2018) has shown that when Spanish speakers with little to no English were given Spanish instructions with gesture, little learning happened. The current research examines what role language preference (whether a child prefers Spanish or English) plays in conjunction with speech and gestures in math instruction.