Event Title

Comparing Numeric and Verbal Cognitive Reflection Tests in a Two-Response Paradigm

Location

Golden Eagles

Department

Psychology

Abstract

Cognitive reflection is commonly understood as the tendency to override an intuitive incorrect response in favor of a non-intuitive correct response. However, recent research suggests individuals who perform well on the standard numeric Cognitive Reflection Test can do so under time pressure and cognitive load conditions, calling into question whether such individuals ever entertain intuitive incorrect responses. This study investigates whether this pattern of results extends to more contemporary non-numeric verbal Cognitive Reflection Tests. Undergraduates (N = 69) completed a two-response Cognitive Reflection Test in which they were required to give a fast intuitive response under time pressure and cognitive load and afterwards were given the time to deliberate. They responded to both standard numeric and non-numeric verbal Cognitive Reflection items. Ongoing analyses investigate whether participants’ performance in the two-response paradigm varies by item type (i.e., numeric vs. non-numeric verbal). Results from this study will help us better understand the underlying processes of cognitive reflection.

Faculty Sponsor

Andrew Young, Northeastern Illinois University

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May 6th, 9:40 AM

Comparing Numeric and Verbal Cognitive Reflection Tests in a Two-Response Paradigm

Golden Eagles

Cognitive reflection is commonly understood as the tendency to override an intuitive incorrect response in favor of a non-intuitive correct response. However, recent research suggests individuals who perform well on the standard numeric Cognitive Reflection Test can do so under time pressure and cognitive load conditions, calling into question whether such individuals ever entertain intuitive incorrect responses. This study investigates whether this pattern of results extends to more contemporary non-numeric verbal Cognitive Reflection Tests. Undergraduates (N = 69) completed a two-response Cognitive Reflection Test in which they were required to give a fast intuitive response under time pressure and cognitive load and afterwards were given the time to deliberate. They responded to both standard numeric and non-numeric verbal Cognitive Reflection items. Ongoing analyses investigate whether participants’ performance in the two-response paradigm varies by item type (i.e., numeric vs. non-numeric verbal). Results from this study will help us better understand the underlying processes of cognitive reflection.