Event Title

Levels of Empathy Among Halal, Vegetarians, Vegans, and Omnivores

Location

Lobby in front of Auditorium

Start Date

19-4-2019 11:00 AM

Department

Psychology

Description

Introduction: Research has shown that vegetarians score higher on empathy scales than omnivores do, and vegans score higher than vegetarians (e.g., Preylo & Arikawa, 2008; Ruby et al., 2012; Preylo, & Arikawa, 2008; Cliceri, Spinelli, Dinnella, Prescott, & Monteleone, 2018). The purpose of this study is to investigate the association between diet type and empathy scores. Although there have been many studies conducted on empathy scales and consumption of meat, there is little research on halal meat consumption and how individuals score on an empathy scale. Halal meat is practiced by muslims and has a ritual in order for the animal to be eaten by muslims. Muslims believe that killing the animal this way causes all the blood to get drained out and is safer to eat (Eardley, 2014). Methodology: Sixty participants will complete an online study involving diet choices and Empathy scores. Participants will be presented with a consent form, then will indicate their dietary preference (i.e., omnivores, vegetarians, vegans, halal meat eaters, or other). The second set of questions will be the Empathy Quotient scale, which consists of 60 questions that will measure empathy scores in participants (higher numbers reflect more empathetic responses). Participants will also respond to demographics questions. Projected Results: It is hypothesized that a vegetarian is more likely to score higher on the empathy scale than an omnivore; that a person who consumes halal meat is more likely to score higher on an empathy scale than an omnivore; and that a vegan is more likely to score high on an empathy scale than a vegetarian. A one-way Anova will be performed (four levels of the independent variable: vegetarians, vegans, omnivores, and halal eaters) on the aggregated empathy scale. Significance: The field of psychology will contribute with halal meat consumption and empathy scores. This is to investigate whether halal meat eaters feel the same level of empathy as vegetarians and vegans do since the slaughtering technique of the animal has a spiritual meaning behind it. This study will contribute to psychology and spread more knowledge about halal eaters and contribute to the field of the psychology, even though it is still a blossoming field.

Comments

Amanda Dykema-Engblade is the faculty sponsor of this poster.

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Apr 19th, 11:00 AM

Levels of Empathy Among Halal, Vegetarians, Vegans, and Omnivores

Lobby in front of Auditorium

Introduction: Research has shown that vegetarians score higher on empathy scales than omnivores do, and vegans score higher than vegetarians (e.g., Preylo & Arikawa, 2008; Ruby et al., 2012; Preylo, & Arikawa, 2008; Cliceri, Spinelli, Dinnella, Prescott, & Monteleone, 2018). The purpose of this study is to investigate the association between diet type and empathy scores. Although there have been many studies conducted on empathy scales and consumption of meat, there is little research on halal meat consumption and how individuals score on an empathy scale. Halal meat is practiced by muslims and has a ritual in order for the animal to be eaten by muslims. Muslims believe that killing the animal this way causes all the blood to get drained out and is safer to eat (Eardley, 2014). Methodology: Sixty participants will complete an online study involving diet choices and Empathy scores. Participants will be presented with a consent form, then will indicate their dietary preference (i.e., omnivores, vegetarians, vegans, halal meat eaters, or other). The second set of questions will be the Empathy Quotient scale, which consists of 60 questions that will measure empathy scores in participants (higher numbers reflect more empathetic responses). Participants will also respond to demographics questions. Projected Results: It is hypothesized that a vegetarian is more likely to score higher on the empathy scale than an omnivore; that a person who consumes halal meat is more likely to score higher on an empathy scale than an omnivore; and that a vegan is more likely to score high on an empathy scale than a vegetarian. A one-way Anova will be performed (four levels of the independent variable: vegetarians, vegans, omnivores, and halal eaters) on the aggregated empathy scale. Significance: The field of psychology will contribute with halal meat consumption and empathy scores. This is to investigate whether halal meat eaters feel the same level of empathy as vegetarians and vegans do since the slaughtering technique of the animal has a spiritual meaning behind it. This study will contribute to psychology and spread more knowledge about halal eaters and contribute to the field of the psychology, even though it is still a blossoming field.